How does the illustration help the reader understand the text sugar change the world?

How does the illustration help the reader understand the text? … The illustration helps the reader recognize how teams cut and bundled sugar cane. The illustration helps the reader determine why sugar cane had to be cut so quickly. The illustration helps the reader observe the hot weather on sugar plantations.

How does the illustration help the reader understand text?

When reading fiction texts, illustrations can help readers to visualize the people, places, and events in the story. Not only do the illustrations help readers see what the words describe, but they can also help readers understand the words themselves.

What is the central claim of this passage sugar changed the world?

The central claim of this passage from Sugar Changed the World is B: The joys of sugar were the result of the suffering of enslaved African people. This passage shows how the worldwide joy of the sugar consumption depended on the suffering of the slaves.

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Which evidence best supports the author’s claim and purpose sugar changed the world?

Answer:The correct answer is “Guests at sugar plantations often remarked on how many one- armed people they saw.” Explanation: The given text is taken from the passage Sugar Changed the World. This text evidence best supports the authors’ claim that a frantic pace made working conditions even worse.

What information does the Illustration add to the text Kingsley learned a difficult skill?

Kingsley learned a difficult skill. Kingsley learned to move the dugout canoe through rapids on the Ogooué. Kingsley visited the “raw Africa” in a dugout canoe, but was not able to get through the rapids.

How did the image help you understand the text?

Answer: Creating sensory images also helps a reader draw on specific details in the text (e.g. a character’s thoughts, words or actions; elements of tone, meaning or beauty of a text), creating an interaction between the reader and the text.

Which is the author’s purpose for writing this passage?

Explanation: The author’s purpose in writing this passage is “to inform”.

Which claim do both passages support sugar changed the world?

Both passages use evidence to show that knowledge of the extreme brutality of the sugar trade changed viewpoints about enslavement. Both passages use evidence to support the claim that lawmakers had more power and influence than abolitionists had.

Which statement best describes the author’s purpose in this passage sugar changed the world?

The authors’ purpose is to persuade readers to agree that sugar production sparked the exploration of North America and other parts of the world. The authors’ purpose is to persuade readers that sugar production created a system that relied on slavery, but also paved the way for revolution.

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What is the central idea of a text sugar Changed the World Part 2?

What is the central idea of the passage Sugar Changed the World Part 2? The central idea In this passage is that spices were popular because they were flavorful, not because they helped people eat spoiled food.

What is a central idea in this passage?

The central idea of a passage or story is the most important concept that the author wants to get across to the reader. • The central idea may be stated directly. The author tells you the main point. •

How does the author’s choice of Hungry?

By conveying that idea, authors show us how brutally the slaves had to work. They were not to rest, because the mills did not rest. … By saying that the mills were hungry, authors create this monster-like image of a creature whose need is imperative.

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